Monday 30 November 2015

Lilies on mars - ∆GO

Article by James Grimshaw


Italian, self-described "cosmic pop" electro-duo Lilies on mars have brought a progressive sound to their new album '∆GO' – one that builds on the admirable tenets of the genre as ascribed by the hypothetical mega-mix from these last years, and brings in elements previously, exclusively aligned to the poorly-produced and ill-conceived sounds of the Bandcamp "newest-first" bin. '∆GO' opens into Grimes territory with ‘Stealing’, an initially-instrumental ode to arpeggiators and '80s-throwback electronic synths eventually infiltrated by the heavily-reverbed, near-childlike evocation “it’s alright”. The track is a strong introduction to ‘∆GO’ and a compositional standout.

Second track and first single ‘Dancing Star’ pulls up to the more twee end of Lilies on mars’ cosmic-pop oeuvre, with a shared, repeated vocal melody playing hopscotch above skittering synth twangs and a murked bass pedal. This end of Lilies on mars, to me, detracts from that moody, stabbing neon-glossed film soundtrack drum sound that features so prominently elsewhere in the album.
Mid-album, ‘From The Earth To Above’ bounces into ears with a Game-Boy-videogame-menu-soundtrack synth melody, Joy-Division-esque bass riff and sound, and more reverb-soaked "oohs" from Masia and Marina. It’s a welcome reprieve from a spate of boring mid-album quicksand all too often found in new releases, and a welcome return to Grimes-channelings as a digi-delayed harmonies warble behind prominent EQ fiddlings and genuine vocal/harmonic thought.

‘Sympathise’ ricochets multiply from wall to wall, with stutter-drums and a poly-rhythmic bass synth colliding intermittently as Masia and Marina move across the electro-pop spectrum to the Bat For Lashes side. Com-Truise-y samples break in as the song progresses, and fresh live-guitar stabs drop between heavily compressed snare hits and cymbal glitches. ‘Sympathise’ is at once unsettling, intriguing and utterly enjoyable. Album closer ‘I’ve Got You’ immediately pulls you down, lower than where you started off with the album. Sparse production enfolds you, whereupon a haunting, drawn-out syllable picks you by the scruff of the neck and floats you in yet further. The landscape makes itself more and more known, modulated feedback implying a tree here and there, until the sun breaks out from behind the noise-gate and you’re made aware of the whole environment. Live drums are on the far side of a great hall while organ sounds float with you in squadron-formation. The album ends to 90 seconds of fuzz, buzz, glitch and the unsubtle evocation of a dial-up modem.

'∆GO' is a sterling album, insofar as it unapologetically weaves a tapestry from the threads of its multiple forbears, and in so doing creates something not entirely dissimilar to something you’ve heard before – but dissimilar enough. It’s the perfect album with which to answer the question "what next?" after a glut of the 'Drive' soundtrack and 'Visions'.







Lilies On Mars' website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Dråpe – Relax/Relapse

Article by James Grimshaw


After a spate of PR-initiated downloadings and listenings of various creative merit, an unmitigated week of busyness, and not a lot of sleep at all, Dråpe represented the clean slate I unknowingly needed. After one listen of the band’s single ‘Round and Around’, the bad had been washed away and replaced with Scandinavian shoegaze. 'Relax/Relapse' is the first album of Ketil Myhre, Eirik Kirkemyr, Eirik Fidjeland, Lars Kristian Boquist and Even Hafnor, and stands as a strong marker for the incredible music coming out of the scene that rarely makes it over to this side of the North Sea. The album is bookended by the titular ‘Relax’ and ‘Relapse’, the former being an instrumental piece of little more than one minute, a perfect vignette of the album’s typical sound.

The first song proper is ‘Replica’ – a poppy, upbeat affair with ulterior motives. It draws you in with promise of '60s-throwback guitar riffs and familiar trem/whammy sounds from surf and Tame Impala, only to pin you there with something wholly different: a plaintive, heart-melting vocal delivery that not only turns the warbled backline on its head but informs exactly how this album will make you feel from now on. Following track ‘?’ plays more with this dichotomy, as Doors organs interplay with Fishing For Crabs falsetto and the now-typical Dråpe guitar sound – apparently achieved in part by the leaving of instruments out in the cold to shrink the wood and alter the tuning slightly.

‘Pie In The Sky’ introduces some drum-driven urgency, with trebled synths, well-disguised guitars and a refreshingly unique, clear bass sound co-mingling for something that could well have been a Weird Fishes/Arpeggi B-side. It surges forward like a burst-bank river taking your house in its entirety: everything is there, defined, and static around you, but you still feel like you and everything are going very very fast, very very loudly. Middle track ‘There Is A House’ is of my favourites on ‘Relax/Relapse’ – after one and a half minutes of what seems like the song’s bread and butter, the band drop into a near-apocalyptic groove that bears little structural relation, and stay there until the song’s end four minutes later. In these four minutes, lead guitars shimmer with 3-bar high-octave chords while bass bounds around the fundaments of the environment and organs, white noise and epistemic delay fiddlings make up the sea-froth of a tidal wave to ‘Pie In The Sky’s river. This is one of those songs of which it’s a shame to reach the end.

‘My Friend The Scientist’ boasts sublime harmonies and suitably fragile surrounding sounds, where ‘And You Change Your Mind’ brings back a familiar sensation, with fervent drum grooves driving endless guitar melody, percussive bass, cirric singing, and your house yet further downstream. ‘Relapse’ closes out the album with intermittently frail-the-strong instrumentation, repeated lyric phrases and cymbal-crashes backswashing the debris from your roof.







Dråpe's website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Dumbo Gets Mad - Andromedian Girl

Article by KevW


This week will see the release of the third album by Italian psych duo Dumbo Gets Mad whose 'Quantum Leap' LP we reviewed a couple of years back. 'Thank You Neil' promises to be a dozen more cosmic dreampop tunes that belong to a strange and futuristic time. Perhaps the Neil in question is the late astronaut Neil Armstrong, as they do have an obsession with the universe beyond our little planet. Nothing we've heard from them so far could be classed as space-rock, but it has been a bit out of this world at times.

Take new single 'Andromedian Girl' for example - it takes the location quite a way further than Ash did on their classic indie-punk tune 'Girl From Mars', and sonically its quite different too. With lethargically lovely instrumentation that's precise and drowsy in all the right ways, plus soft and relaxed vocals that match it perfectly, this is almost an update of something that could have appeared on Air's 'Moon Safari' album, and will likely appeal to fans of the French band. Really this is a relaxing form of musical escapism, and you don't really want it to end.



Dumbo Gets Mad's website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

The Smoking Trees - Victoria's Garden

Article by KevW


Each time we think that the deluge of every form of psychedelia going is about to stop, or at least start to yield diminishing returns, something comes along to change our minds. In this instance its Los Angeles duo The Smoking Trees, long time favourites, who released their latest album 'TST' back in the summer. This wispy, weird and woozy track does have a summer vibe to it, even containing the sound of insects buzzing around, and the strange video places elephants in field of sunflowers. Not quite their usual habitat as far as we know...

OK, so 'Victoria's Garden' is a song about love, but before you start thinking about smutty innuendo, it should be pointed out that (apparently) the deterioration of her garden in the lyrics is actually a metaphor for a relationship drifting apart, so it's actually quite sad. That said, the late '60s acid flavour keeps it relatively bright. Lyrically lines such as "Victoria's garden, it came from the sea, there's only a flower surrounded by weeds" and "the hose has a leek" mean it's definitely about what they claim, right? Good, I'm glad we've cleared that up...



The Smoking Trees' website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Get Me Free #96: No Kill - Better

Article by KevW


For the last few years, barely a day went by without the words "Brooklyn" or "Portland" being mentioned on The Sound Of Confusion. For whatever reason (probably that we just receive so much stuff that we've missed loads) both musical hubs have appeared relatively quiet by comparison. There will be heaps of great new music being made in either location I'm sure, and Brooklyn duo No Kill are representing the east coast incredibly well with new single 'Better', in fact, I wish we'd known about them sooner as they've been around for half a decade or so.

'Better' is lush, slightly warped-sounding dreampop with groaning guitars that flesh-out the song and relaxed but strong vocals being the focal point. A steady beat is pushed further back into the eerie mists of the track, never ceasing until the very end. Production-wise there's a shoegaze aspect to the music, but the voice pulls it away from that style with its clarity and emotion, yet a wall-of-noise is the canvas on which it's painted. There's a repetitiveness to 'Better' that actually makes it quite familiar feeling and immediate, where in other hands it could become dull. No Kill are far from dull here though, and this tune will make your day that bit more magical for a few minutes.



No Kill's website





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Sunday 29 November 2015

National Pastime - Bring Me Your Sunshine

Article by KevW


National Pastime have always been a prolific group, and this is surely down to the fact that they contain multiple songwriters, not least the even more prolific Andy B. With Andrew Padfield covering lead vocals and Chris Head on drums, they're set to release their fourth full-length early next year (I know they like to live in the past a little musically, but I'm guessing the date of "early 2015" on the press release is a typo!) - and if they didn't have enough talent in the band, for this album they're joined by Scott Morrison, leader of recently revived C86 types The Morrisons and solo artist in his own right. So we can perhaps expect new material even more frequently in the future...

The title-track to 'Bring Me Your Sunshine' doesn't break from the retro indiepop sound that both the band and their label Pastime Records have become known for. There's a familiar sadness to the vocals and lyrics which is enhanced by simple piano notes, but the addition of Morrison means that the flashes of lead guitar are particularly effective. 'Do What You Do' also has an '80s sound, but they mix in a little '60s psychedelic garage thanks again to the neat guitar line. The themes of lost love and reminiscing about days gone by that have hallmarked their music are intact across these four songs that feel as though they were written late at night when the mind somehow becomes more reflective than in the cold light of day. Pretty slowie 'Summer Haze' talks of broken hearts to a soft keyboard backing with fresh-sounding guitar strums and is melodically a little different to some of the group's previous material. Finally, 'Perfect In Every Way' is unmistakably National Pastime in its writing, but with maybe a touch grittier guitar work blending in with the organ. Fans of vintage indie won't be let down by 'Bring Me Your Sunshine', and as it's essentially an album sampler, you'd have to say the future looks bright.





National Pastime's website

Buy the EP





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Get Me Free #95: Eternals - Out Of Context

Article by KevW


It was Gram Parsons who coined the phrase "cosmic American music", and he'd most likely approve of Massachusetts group Eternals' new single as a continuation of that idea. Parsons may have been closer to traditional country, but he was pushing its boundaries, and since his untimely death, many bands and artists have taken on that mantle. The four members of this band have been involved with many projects over the past decade or so, including Marissa Nadler, Titus Andronicas and Passion Pit to name but a few, and in 2013 they began working on original material together. Their album 'Isn't That Anyone' is due out early next year.

New single 'Out Of Context' does take in a little country - perhaps alt-country would be a better term - as well as the atmospheric production of high-end dreampop groups. Throw in some classic harmonies (think CSNY or Fleet Foxes) and a smooth but not to sanitised overall sound and you have an excellent introduction to the band (if you're not aware of them already, a mini-album was released last year). You can even detect echoes of Belle & Sebastian about the melody, but really this is beautiful Americana that transcends the genre slightly due to the combination of other influences that help make this a very lush offering from a band to definitely make a note of.



Eternals' website





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Saturday 28 November 2015

Get Me Free #94: Prints Jackson - Alexanders Dark Band

Article by KevW


Apparently, Prints Jackson is planning a Christmas song for the December installment of his quest to record and release one song every month, and it'll come complete with choirs. Sounds intriguing, but November's edition, 'Alexanders Dark Band', is a pretty good early present as it is, and is perhaps one of his best tracks thus far. As usual there is a slight DIY side to things, but this is a cracking alt-rock/indie track that makes for a nice update of the mid-'90s US alternative guitar scene. In fact, considering he's British, this does have a surprisingly American feel.

It's not just the vocals and the post-grunge styling that make this such a good offering either. The bassline and buzzing guitars reel you in due to their sheer tunefulness and then the melody of the vocal really nails it. There's more depth here then in some of his songs, both lyrically and musically this seems stronger and more inventive, using a multitude of layers and overdubs, as well as samples and electronics to forge what is a stand-out from a project that's been consistently good.



Prints Jackson's website





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Friday 27 November 2015

Library Voices - Lovish

Article by KevW


Perhaps due to having so many band members (there were originally ten, but they've now slimmed down to a mere seven) is what has made Canadian collective Library Voices reasonably eclectic. Most of their output would fall into the indie/alt-rock category, but they flit between garage-rock, shoegaze, alt-country, post-punk, indiepop, new-wave, dreampop and more ordained alt-rock, plus more besides. New album 'Lovish' is a perfect example of how the septet make all of this work together to form a cohesive and incredibly assured and consistent listening experience.

Single 'Oh Donna' gets things underway with a little bombast, changing tempos, excellent musicianship and equally great production. It's smooth and considered and sinks in right away, making it a perfect opening gambit, before the misty 'Sunburnt In LA' combines an '80s feel with the sound of more recent North American indie bands and is a propulsive number that is equally as appealing. Then we hit the scratchy post-punk of 'Slacker' which underlines their adaptability, using distortion on the vocals and a simple riff to great effect. Three songs in and already they've shown this chameleon-like ability. 'Zzyzx' is perhaps closer in sound to 'Oh Donna' and brings back a bit more bombast thanks to some horns that give an almost Springsteen-esque vibe at times, but the vocals ensure that you could never get the two mixed up. And it's unlikely you'd find The Boss referencing 'Marquee Moon' on one of his songs...

We're then into indiepop territory with the lovable jangle of 'Hey! Adrienne'. By this point it's dawned on you that Library Voices don't really do "album tracks". Pretty much every song on 'Lovish' could be a potential single, even tender, lovelorn slowie 'The Wild Roar Of Love', which may not at first seem the most upbeat and radio-friendly, is easy on the ear. There's an electronic, new-wave side to 'Escape Artist' - no trick is repeated twice but at the same time the difference isn't so great as to become incohesive, and this is the key to this LP's success. 'Fangs Of Love' is a curious beast, combining classic '60s rock with the fuzz of shoegaze, a decent brass section and a glam stomp. It's not always necessary to mention each song when reviewing a record, but this is something of an exception. 'Death By Small Talk' is perhaps the most alternative and psychedelic song of the lot, but it's still a fusion of ideas and styles; it's maybe less instant too, but your taste buds are soon tingling again with the punky pace installed in 'Bored In Berlin' which is a bit like The War On Drugs after too much Ritalin. Library Voices are even kind enough to supply us with an epic, experimental last track in the form of 'Every Night' which begins with Byrdsy guitars and a military beat before evolving into an expansive, brooding number ending with a psychedelic wig-out and the hiss of static electricity. There can be no doubt that 'Lovish' is a good job well done.







Library Voices' website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Problems With The Supposed "Vinyl Revival"?

Article originally published by Nathanial Cramp on Sonic Cathedral's Facebook page


What is the point of releasing records on vinyl?

Anyone know?

I ask because this week (November 23rd), at the launch party for Disappears' 'Low: Live In Chicago' LP at The 100 Club in London, we didn't have any copies of the record available to sell. There also weren't any in the shops last Friday as the official release date came and went. This is despite the order being placed in April, the audio being delivered in May, the artwork being signed off on July 8 and the test pressings being approved on August 5. Oh, and the small matter of paying £2,787 for the manufacture of what will undoubtedly be an incredibly beautiful and special record (despite what the reviewer on Drowned In Sound might claim).

Where else would you pay all that money up front, with no guarantee of making a release date, or an album launch gig? Not to mention the other costs on top of that, such as advertising, now rendered almost completely pointless with nothing to actually sell.

So, again, what is the point of releasing records on vinyl?

It just seems to be a nice little earner for the major labels – some sample 'new' releases include Bob Dylan's freely available '60s albums and a triple-vinyl set of Roger Waters doing 'The Wall' *shudder* – and if you're an indie, good luck getting a pressing slot. Only four and a half months until Record Store Day! (This whole situation is more grist to the ‪#‎recordstoredayisdying‬ mill; it's the same problem, too many snouts at the feeding trough.)

Ironically, tonight's gig is being recorded and released on a tape that will be ready to sell at next weekend's Independent Label Market. If we're lucky we might have some vinyl to sell there, too.
Don't hold your breath, though...

UPDATE: After much delay, we finally have 'Low: Live In Chicago' by Dissapears on vinyl. It will be available at the Indie Label Market on Saturday, pre-orders will go out next week and it will be in shops from December 11. Big thanks to our very own Peter Saville - Marc Jones -  for the design, and to @roxytheman for making it look more like how we imagined it in these photos!




Disappears' website

Download the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Slim Twig - Live In, Live On Your Era

Article by KevW


Having your music released on certain labels always gives it a stamp of approval, in fact we could name many such imprints, but DFA Records is generally considered to rarely let music fans down. Earlier this year they released the new album from acclaimed Canadian artist Slim Twig and, as expected, 'Thank You For Stickin' With Twig' rightly received rave reviews. Now Max Turnbull (the man behind the alias) is heading to Europe for some shows and has released a new single, 'Live In, Live On Your Era', from the album to coincide, and it comes with unusual video that looks like it should have been made in the early '80s by some new romantic band.

Musically, Slim Twig is quite eclectic, but you wouldn't really class him as new romantic in any way. 'Live In, Live On Your Era' is a track about "accepting your own cultural circumstances", and musically its difficult to pin down without using fairly generic terms such as "indie" or "psychedelia". A classic riff anchors the song and stop/start drums and vocal bursts make this something interesting when generally they can prevent music being as fluid as it could be. You can pick out elements of folk lurking in the background too, as well as the occasional flash of '70s rock. It's a melting pot of ideas, but the end result works brilliantly.





Slim Twig's website

Buy the single

Catch him live:

27.11 Berlin, DE @ Badenhaus Szimpla
28.11 Leipzig, DE @ Pracht
01.12 Hamburg, DE @ Hafenklang
02.12 London, UK @ Dalston Victoria
03.12 Brighton, UK @ The Hope

04.12 Amsterdam, NL @ De Nieuwe Anita
05.12 Tournai, BE @ Water Moulin
07.12 Bilbao, ES @ Antzokia
08.12 Oviedo, ES @ La Lata de Zinc
11.12 Paris, FR @ Espace B
12.12 Milan, IT @ Sacrestia






The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Get Me Free #93: Embers - The Bitten Tongue

Article by KevW


I'm sure we weren't the only ones thinking that we'd heard the last from Manchester's Embers. It was late 2012 that we caught wind of the band through a couple of immensely impressive live performances and went on to include them in our tips for 2013 list. But then... silence. Quite why we don't know, and it's probably none of our business anyway, but the surprise announcement of a new single this week was a very welcome bolt out of the blue - especially as the band launched it with the words "We've been away far, far too long. Never again". So does this mean we can look forward to live shows next year? An album maybe?

Future plans will reveal themselves in due course, but the quartet seem intent on not leaving us waiting, and new track 'The Bitten Tongue' is big and bold enough to act like a statement of intent. Mind you, the same goes for everything they'd done so far. It doesn't sound as though Embers have changed too much since we last heard from them; the grandeur and ambition is still in evidence, but perhaps 'The Bitten Tongue' is slightly less cinematic, although its no less powerful for it. Thunderous drums and an expansive, all-conquering sound mean that this is still a group to make you stand up and take notice. One of the most promising alternative rock bands have awoken from their slumber, and they seem ready to blow similar acts out of the water.



Embers' website





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Thursday 26 November 2015

Omega Vague - Ever

Article by KevW


I think we can safely say that Craig Douglas is a very talented man (this isn't the same Craig Douglas who hit the charts in the '50s and '60s by the way... that would be even more amazing). As writer, vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, he's created some great music as Omega Vague and, as with most of his work, this cut from recent EP 'Tension Sessions' features no other players but him, with Chris Cretella helping out on knob-twiddling duties. The EP shows a certain degree of variation too, with some more atmospheric cuts, but 'Ever' is a definite highlight.

There's no messing around with intros really, Omega Vague get straight into business with drums, bass, guitars and harmonies all hitting you like a wall of sound from the first second. Vocally this is very soft and almost ethereal which is the perfect foil for the music. You could call this streamlined shoegaze, as it does contain elements of that genre, but the persistent beat makes you think of krautrock-inspired dreampop. 'Ever' glides along with ease and never stops to take a breath. It's a fluid, lush and soaring number that would be impressive had it had the input of a few band members. As solo projects go, Omega Vague is on the money and can tackle the lot himself though. And with several previous releases to check out, our weekend listening is already sorted.



Omega Vague's website

Stream or buy the EP





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Straw Bear - All You Need Is An Electric Guitar

Article by KevW


If I'm honest, were I to find myself stranded in the middle of a rain forest, at the top of a mountain, or even on a desert island, I'm not sure an electric guitar would be the most useful implement to aid my survival. That said, the electric guitar has been probably the most crucial instrument in the development of rock and pop music of many, many genres as we know them. And, yes, plenty of songs have been recorded and can be played using that solitary piece of equipment. So I'll be less pedantic and give the six-stringed axe its due. Where would we be without it? This site would be very different, and so too would the music of Straw Bear.

Fittingly, the band's Facebook header photo shows all five members of the London collective with a guitar of some description in their hands, and new single 'All You Need Is An Electric Guitar' makes good use of at least a couple of those. A contagious indie-type track with a slight alt-country twang lurking just below the surface, this is smooth without being too slick, poppy without bowing down to current trends, and is likely to find favour with lovers of a variety of musical styles. From the alternative crowd to more mainstream types and even your dad, this tune is strong enough and universal enough to get spotted through the crowd. It's no wonder that coverage of Straw Bear has so far come from such a wide variety of places, and with their latest single that coverage should only increase.



Straw Bear's website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Schizo Fun Addict/The Bordellos - KASSETTE

Article by KevW


Musicians stepping up to do their bit for good causes is hardly a new thing, but it quite often involves bands who have enough money to pay off the deficit of a small African country in their bank accounts asking for your cash in return for a dodgy charity single that will quickly be forgotten. Perhaps this is a good gesture, but if they dipped their collective hands in their pockets they'd probably raise even more money than the record they're flogging. 2015, maybe more than any other year I can think of, has seen smaller independent artists releasing genuinely good music with the proceeds going to worthy organisations (The Broken HeedWake The Deaf' compilation...). This new limited edition cassette and download release by Small Bear Records is essentially two albums in one: a new eponymous collection from New York area lo-fi indie/punk/shoegaze group Schizo Fun Addict, and an eponymous new album from St Helens underground noiseniks The Bordellos, and the proceeds from this mammoth album (it is two full albums, one on each side) will go to Save The Children. The artwork is supplied by Stone Roses legend John Squire. It's a splendid package for sure.

Firstly then, to side A and eleven new recordings from Schizo Fun Addict. In a way this shows some kind of split personality for the band, or maybe just the enthusiasm and ideas to flit between DIY -sounding scree and quite stately, well-produced pieces. Their inventiveness also comes through, kicking-off with the rumbling squall of 'Lake Of Fire' which mixes raw punk with samples, electronics and an unhealthy level of distortion. But that's nothing compared to what else they deliver. 'Her Name Is Love' is a ragged clatter with affected vocals, before totally changing course for a brief interlude of poppy female vocals. Like their entire side, it's all over the shop, but in a good way. There are hints of '90s slacker-rock on 'Make A Stand', only with angrier vocals - again this is lightened by the softer female voice before it becomes more urgent and closer to classic alt-rock/punk and also '80s indie (Josef K is referenced). The changes are often quite dramatic, with the pure lo-fi pop of 'Lotion Chills Beast' feeling less abrasive, and 'Beggin For Shelter' following suit to a degree and being something of a stand-out. The minute-long 'The Pale Horse' uses early '90s big beats like those made chart-topping by The KLF.

The real surprise comes in the shape of 'Dream Of The Portugal Keeper - Part 2' which is a sweeping, gorgeous dreampop number with both voices sounding splendid and the end result being a classy, slightly cinematic indie/pop song that punctures the entire vibe of the album by sounding like an entirely different band. But it's followed by 'To Love' which is similar, if not quite as grand, and is another reminder that Schizo Fun Addict are by no means one-dimensional. For example,  'A.M. Story' hovers between Cocteau Twins-esque dreampop and the noisier end of shoegaze. Then it's back to the sound of home-recordings with 'Diesel Dolphin' which consists of a beat that barely holds itself together and a crude, stripped-back arrangement that's almost totally devoid of production. If you think this is a bad thing then think again. As well as the aforementioned '90s alt-rock sound, there are faint echoes of Syd Barrett here, and that's rarely a bad thing. 'Schizo Fun Addict' is wonderfully disjointed and you never quite know what's around the corner - not just from song to song, but from second to second. It should be enough to make listeners unfamiliar with the band to delve into their back catalogue for some more pleasant surprises.

And so to The Bordellos. Uncompromisingly lo-fi at times, the band have occasionally thought about flirting with a more polished sound in the past, but never really embraced it, which is what has earned then the cult status they have. They open with the excellent, wistful 'I may be reborn' and then waste no time in letting you know their current stance, as 'Chocolate my new rock n' roll' and 'Hallucinations' both sound like demos recorded on a knackered old four-track - something which only adds to the character. Both have neat melodies too. Then they dig out the fuzz that some may associate with some of their past releases. 'Hit it' screeches and contorts at times, taking the wildest '60s garage and warping it further. Even here there are flashes of a potential hit record, something that The Bordellos seem determined to avoid at all costs. 'King of the bedroom' feels like it was recorded using an old box as a drum kit and whatever instruments they could find lying around. It also continues their recent fascination with the phrase "pork sword". The crudeness of some lyrics and recording techniques so far is suddenly brushed aside by 'Melody inn' in much the same way that Schizo Fun Addict did with their contribution. This is still lo-fi but is quite affecting, especially lyrically.

"Smile you soft get, smile" is the lyrical refrain to 'Soft get smile', a song that's another reasonably bare-boned affair but is rather nice with it. Whether the two bands on 'KASSETTE' decided that they'd both have quieter, more tender mid-sections to their albums before hand is unlikely, but it's exactly what happens. 'Star light' is even softer with distant vocals and a minimal arrangement, and 'Temperature drop' shows a very humane and compassionate side to a band who've often been quite blunt in their subject matter and this has the effect of holding your attention - a valuable asset on a double album. You could say the same about 'The girl belongs to yesterday' which is a tale of lost love that feels more intimate thanks to the (lack of) production which is typically warts and all. It's fitting that the last song on the album is another engaging, simply-arranged but nicely written track called 'Who's too blame' where The Bordellos manage to talk about shagging like rabbits during the Manchester acid scene without sounding crass in any way. It's strangely romantic. You never know what to expect from each passing Bordellos release, and word was that this would be one of their most lo-fi to date. Well, it probably is, but its all the more compelling for it, especially as they forgo the noise for a more pensive approach much of the time. As a whole, 'KASSETTE' is a very good record for a very good cause, so instead (well, preferably as well, but don't bother listening, just donate the money and give this priority) of any upcoming cheesy or stadium-shaped charity records that the megastars may have in the pipeline why not treat yourself, and Save The Children, to something a bit more interesting.









Schizo Fun Addict's website

The Bordellos' website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Hazel English - Fix/It's Not Real/Never Going Home

Article by KevW

Photo by Brandon Long

Quite how Hazel English has evaded our ears for this long I have no idea. Granted, she only has three songs online so far, all from this year, and none of them appear to be publicly available for anything besides streaming (if anyone knows any different, please let us know!), but surely a deal of some kind is just around the corner. The fanbase that the Oakland artist has built up already is quite impressive, but that's a testament to the quality of the few tracks that we are able to hear (perhaps her inner circle will know many more...). These really are quite gorgeous indiepop tunes with a dreamy quality and a huge appeal which, with many bands, isn't always as apparent at what we assume is an early stage in a career.

'Never Going Home' is the earliest track posted, and it's a kaleidoscopic mix of spangly guitars, electronic beats and washes of synth, not to mention English's swoonsome voice. It's no wonder people cottoned-on quickly. Next came 'It's Not Real' which is reminiscent of the C86 scene that came out of the UK or the indie bands brought to us by New Zealand's Flying Nun Records in the '80s; so pretty timeless and utterly lovely basically. Most recent track 'Fix' could be the best of the bunch (although these are fine margins), comprising of similar ingredients but feeling that bit more sunkissed and having even more beautiful vocals and melodies. If Hazel English continues the amazing run of form, then you'll be hearing a lot more about her very soon.







Hazel English's website





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Get Me Free #92: The Rayguns - Never Been To California

Article by KevW


The form of punk created by The Rayguns is pretty traditional, making it a nice change from the legions of modern bands ruining the genre by aiming for a goofball approach (blame Green Day for that one), but that's not to say that their new EP 'Never Been To California' isn't fun though. It's a riot from start to finish, and doesn't try to be particularly political or pretentious. Its title may well be a fact (well, it's a fact for me, but possibly the band too) as they're from the opposite side of the US in Boston (where, coincidentally, I have been) where they formed around a year ago. So perhaps they're yet to visit the west coast.

Having gigged around their home town and New York, their live show must be starting to shape up pretty well, so perhaps a tour of that part of the country will happen if word spreads. The song 'Never Been To California' is something of a break from the norm for the band, as its the only track that passes the two-minute mark, and even then it feels as though its over in a flash. The Rayguns are as energetic as they come and scuzzed-out guitars, drumming that will probably give you RSI if you keep it up too long, and a distinct tunefulness runs right through the EP, particularly the impressive title-track. More of the same and the'll be dipping their toes in the Pacific before too long.



The Rayguns' website

Stream or buy the EP





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Wednesday 25 November 2015

Scarlet Echo - Emergency Exit

Article by KevW


As you may have noticed, we love bands' descriptions of their own music. With regular genre names becoming more irrelevant and bleeding closer into one another by the day, it's always good to hear what the artists themselves would go with. So how about "ferocious echsopheric music" then? That's what Essex group Scarlet Echo are going with, although we're not quite sure what "echospheric" means, but it does, curiously, seem to fit. They also go with electronic shoegaze, which may be fitting for some of their tracks, but perhaps not current single 'Emergency Exit' which is from their recently released album 'An Exact Portrayal Of Nothing In Particular'.

There is a large electronic element to 'Emergency Exit', but it's more in line with new-wave, and it does have a certain ferocity too. This is a galloping tune with a prominent post-punk bassline and a hint of goth. You could easily believe this was released in the first half of the '80s (they do mention "1984", but in the context of the song that's clearly the book, not the year). Given the media panic of recent events between Turkey and Russia, you couldn't blame anyone for wanting to take the emergency exit right now, and there's something urgent and post-apocalyptic about this song which seems oddly relevant. It'll blow the cobwebs away at any rate.



Scarlet Echo's website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Whyte Horses - La Couleur Originelle

Article by KevW


Whether or not Manchester-based group White Horses actually have any connection to France we can't tell, but as the title of this new track would suggest, it is their chosen language in which to sing. But, hey, they've supported Silver Apples and had The Go! Team mastermind Ian Parton DJ at their gigs, so they can do whatever the heck they like as far as we're concerned. Saying that, shared stages and great connections are one thing, but ultimately bands should be judged on their own merits - what they do, not who they know.

They describe themselves as a psychedelic pop group and they're not wrong, but it's a different kind of psych. That genre, almost invariably, throws up comparisons to '60s groups, and 'La Couleur Originelle' is no different. What is different is that it's the French ye-ye scene and the vintage pop that it threw out that is recalled here, and this is where this group and The Go! Team cross paths. Without wishing to labour the point about the French sound, fans of Stereolab could do worse than get stuck into this too. It really is a fine piece of bright and uplifting alternative pop music, and listening to a few other snippets from the band, their debut album 'Pop Or Not' (due next year) is lining up to be a corker.



Whyte Horses' website





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Vinten - You Don't Know Me

Article by KevW


In this day and age, it may seem unusual to try and pin certain sounds down to a specific country or area, apart from new emerging scenes perhaps. Vinten might be new as a band, but the music they make is a traditional mix of indie, alt-rock, folk and even Americana, and in a blindfold test you'd probably guess that they were an American group. So discovering that they call Melbourne home was a slight surprise (although, as mentioned, for no good reason). The song is the second to be released from their forthcoming debut EP which is due next month.

A little less punchy than harmony-rich debut 'Don't Turn Around', 'You Don't Know Me' may be more folky, starting with acoustic guitar and strings, but the harmonies remain and add much more to the song than a single-tracked voice would. Electric guitars and drums jump in and the tempo creeps up, and while this may be a nice enough listen at first, it grows with each play, so giving it a few spins to sink in properly would be a good plan. Both songs Vinten have released so far show a group who are more than capable of entering a saturated market with enough uniqueness to stand a fighting chance.



Vinten's website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

The Deadline Shakes - Zealots

Article by KevW


The music press, right from global brands down to the smallest blogs or free publications, are often guilty of over-hyping bands after a couple of impressive singles, only for the resulting album to not live up to expectations. This can be due to labels rushing groups for material to ride the crest of the wave, because the pressure is so much that the band in question feel the heat and buckle under the weight, or simply because, sometimes, we all get a bit carried away. Glasgow's The Deadline Shakes have been subjected to plenty of excitable reactions, not least from us, since they released the utterly sublime 'Bright Spot In A Bad Year' single two years ago. That track was a wondrous amalgamation of several decades of pop music and truly impressed. It's also a rerecorded (and even better) version of that song that opens up anticipated first LP 'Zealots'. How do you go about completing an album when such a high-water mark it stuck right at the start?

If you're The Deadline Shakes then you just keep on doing what you do best: taking classic rock, pop and indie music, whacking it all into a blender with some addictive melodies, beautiful arrangements. great production and a sprinkling of gold dust. Plus, if you've followed the band for a while then you'll know that they've come up with the goods at every turn so far. The string-filled, '70s-sounding 'Slipping From Your Heart' takes the approach mentioned above and turns out a delight of a song that isn't like any other groups currently doing the rounds. The attention to detail and the structure are amazing and unique. 'Sweeten The Deal' still comes over as rampant experimental guitar-pop that's full of fun, 'Phonecalls In The Bath' is the perfect vehicle for Greg Dingwall's splendid voice and is flooded with emotion and more of those glorious arrangements, and recent single 'Frozen Out' possess magical qualities that occasionally bring to mind 'Pet Sounds'-era Beach Boys.

In a way, The Deadline Shakes shouldn't work as well as they do. The '60s pop of bands like The Byrds and The Beatles, as well as classic indiepop, might be deemed suitable reference points, but ELO and Queen have never been particularly cool, especially the latter, although if you look past the novelty hits they had some great tunes hidden away on their early albums. With ELO recently back in the spotlight thanks to a new album and tour, they seem to have undergone a reappraisal though. The chorus to 'Shelters' could be lifted from one of their better known songs - if it had been covered by Sparks that is. In a way it sums up what this band are all about; normal song structures are thrown out of the window and replaced by music that drifts, shifts, and seems to have just teleported in from a fantasy land where you can go from '70s rock guitar bursts to delicate harmonious pieces in the space of a single track.

Adding crestfallen but gorgeous female vocals to the brief lament 'When Will I Ever Learn?' only makes the song more affecting, and the similarly short and tender 'You're Coming With Me' creates a similar atmosphere with some stirring strings. 'You Bring The Class' is the same kind of era-spanning, intricate alternative pop music that Guillimots have been attempting to make for the past decade or so, and its not the only time that 'Zealots' recalls that band, but where Guillimots have always been hit and miss, The Deadline Shakes dish up hit after hit. With 'A Little While Waiting' they almost toy with convention, but by halfway through it's gone off on a tangent without you even noticing. As disjointed as these songs may seem on paper, the transitions are always effortless. The secret to The Deadline Shakes' success is captured by the title of the song another former single 'Don't Be Too Cool', where we're left to wonder how anyone can take a combination of Guillimots, ABBA, Belle & Sebastian and Queen and not have the resulting track sound like a dog's dinner.

'Zealots', simply put, is an album that doesn't fit any trends, either old or new. It inhabits its own space where the only rule is that there are no rules and shows that the most unlikely of combinations can fit with stunning results in the right hands. This is brimming with more ideas than most bands will produce in a lifetime, and they're fully realised here. It may be wrong to get too excited about a band after only a couple of songs have been released, but The Deadline Shakes have proven that's not always the case. In fact, they've gone beyond that hype and surpassed expectations. 'Zealots' should be heralded as a classic debut album, and that's not an exaggeration. "Who can tell if you're gonna build it to last?" is a question posed on typically grandiose and eclectic finale, a new version of early recording 'Boy'. Well, predicting the future, especially in music, is a tricky business, but these thirteen songs have given us every right to consider The Deadline Shakes one of the best new bands in the country.





The Deadline Shakes' website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

guns - I Know Exactly How It Feels

Article by KevW


guns might not seem like the most befitting of names for an artist who delivers soothing, synth-based dreampop, but when you learn that her real name is Gunhild Jarwson Tekle then you can see where it comes from. Hailing from Trondheim in Norway, guns began to make music properly whilst living in Denmark, and has since released an acclaimed debut single, Ricochet, follow-up 'I Know Exactly How It Feels', and is working towards the release of an EP. It's safe to say that after some deserved rave reviews, there will be a slight weight of expectation on her shoulders.

When you listen to the modern take on woozy Scandi-pop that guns already appears to have perfected, then you can see why. 'I Know Exactly How It Feels' is full of beautiful layers of synth, a jittery electronic beat and, of course, her inviting vocals that fit the dreampop genre perfectly; guns has certainly found her niche. The thing about this song is that its appeal doesn't just lie with alternative music fans - this is a pop song above all else, but a wonderfully accomplished one that doesn't fit the identikit chart-brigade's idea of pop. There's every chance guns could find herself knocking a few of them off their perch of she keeps this up though.



guns' website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Get Me Free #91: TIDEUP - Heartbeat

Article by KevW


Florida duo TIDEUP may not throw new singles at us every couple of weeks like some bands, but the fact that they're not overly prolific means that when they do offer up new material it's going to sound pretty special. Their first EP, 'Curses', was released back in 2013, along with single 'A Dance In The Dark' which drew high praise from us. Two years on and the first cut from second EP 'Memories' is sounding just as seductive and silky as those past recordings, combining a soulful edge with electronic dreampop.

We used The xx as a comparison before, in part due to the minimal nature of the song, and that still stands on 'Heartbeat'. This is a lusher track overall, but the unhurried spaciousness and lack of clutter are what give the song such a eerily chilled vibe - chilled but not cold. 'Heartbeat' is warm and snuggly and seems to envelop you as you listen; it almost feels as though it should have been the direction that chillwave went before it fizzled out. TIDEUP share much in common with that genre, but the determination to avoid being deliberately lo-fi and get the most out of their songs stands them on much firmer footing.



TIDEUP's website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Tuesday 24 November 2015

TÜLIPS - Perfect Love

Article by KevW


There perhaps couldn't be a better name than 'Doom & Bloom' for the debut album by Los Angeles quartet TÜLIPS. If you look to the beginnings of the band, you find shoegaze fan Taleen Kali and riot-pop fan Angie Bloom sending each other mixtapes through the mail when they were living apart. When they were both back in LA they began jamming and coming up with tunes, before deciding that a full band would be needed to realise their ambition, so Miles Faster and Travis Moore joined and they perfected a sound they accurately describe as "riotgaze" - the amalgamation of their personal tastes.

You may want to call it noise-pop or punk, but it's definitely a riot and is full of scuffed guitars and minimal production. The album was mixed by Brad Laner of shoegazers Medicine who seems to have totally nailed the group's vision. Single 'Perfect Love' is a short but sweet barbed-wire kiss where punk attitude and vintage melodic prowess collide to recall bands such as The Muffs or even a scruffier Veruca Salt. Often, songs like this can be a little throwaway, and while it's impossible to tell whether people will still be listening to TÜLIPS in a few decades time, there's enough fun to be had here not to write of that idea completely.



TÜLIPS' website

Stream or buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Facebook and Facebook

SKATERS - Mental Case

Article by KevW


The avid TV fans among you will probably recognise 'Arrested Development' actress Alia Shawkat in this new video by New York "plasma punk" (whatever that means) group SKATERS, and having a star turn in the visuals for one of your songs doesn't do any harm, but the single alone is good enough to get attention of its own accord. Formed in 2012, the band have previously released music through Warner Brothers, but 'Mental Case' marks the return to their DIY roots - despite the celebrity cameo, the video was pretty cheap to make, so they've done a great job there.

Musically though, there's not much sign of SKATERS going all bedroom-pop on us, and 'Mental Case' is fully loaded with a string section to augment what is quite a thoughtful, '90s-flavoured indie/pop tune. Taking a little from slacker types such as Pavement, and also borrowing (intentionally or otherwise) from certain Britpop tracks, this is a tuneful and accessible number that manages not to lose any of its independent/alternative charm while it's at it. In some ways this could be seen as a new phase for the band, but musically, it's simply a continuation of the good work they've done so far.





SKATERS' website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Lights That Change - Starlight

Article by KevW


It's been two years since North Wales dreampop group Lights That Change first hit our radar, and at that point they were essentially a duo driven by writer/guitarist Marc Joy. There has been a change in line-up since then, with Mandy Clare joining on vocals and John Bryan on bass. Single 'Voices' was released earlier this year, and its follow-up, 'Starlight', is now available ahead of the band's debut album 'Byzantium' early next year. 'Voices' featured guest vocals from Golden Fable's Rebecca Palin who's set to appear on other LP tracks, and additional input will come from OMD's Malcolm Holmes who provides drums and drum programming on some tracks.

'Starlight' has subtle, spacious beats, and they suit this form of airy, expansive dreampop perfectly. Nothing here is overdone; a memorable bassline and gentle guitar strums make up the backbone of the song, with soft, smooth and occasionally wispy vocals taking pole position in the mix so as to come through crystal clear. Washes of sound give a fuller effect and act as something of a backdrop to which all this is set, allowing the track to retain a wall of sound appeal. As with many artists in this category, the spectre of Liz Fraser isn't far away, although Clare's voice is less affected giving an organic touch that's fairly uncommon. One to drift away to.



Lights That Change's website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Blang Records - Lucky Dip (Blang 2005 - 2015)

Article by KevW


It may have been ten years ago that London's Blang Records launched its first release, but the roots go back to the turn of the century and the Blang nights that label boss and Sergeant Buzfuz main man Joe Murphy put on as part of the antifolk scene of the time which had spread from across the Atlantic. While the label (wrongly) and his band (perhaps more correctly) are still associated with that movement, this eighteen-track compilation paints a much more varied picture, dipping in and out of a plethora of genres and showcasing the diversity of both the label's releases and of good music in general. If you're disillusioned with new music and what you've heard on mainstream TV and radio in the past decade, then you've been looking in the wrong place.

"I've got something to say with this beautiful music" - that lyric from politically-charged post-punks Thee Cee Cees' rousing recent single 'Soapbox' could be a rallying cry for the album and its ethics. If we look at the folk and antifolk side of the equation, then great things can found from Emily Capell and her excellent 'Who Killed Smilie Culture?' single from last year; Matt Dolphin's pensive 'Deptford Shore' which is closer to modern alt-folk and piles on the atmosphere; Lucy's Diary who give us 'Revolving Doors' which has its roots in the genre but coats the song with lush production and is gently brooding, and Dexter Bently's 2008 track 'Killer Kane' can also be linked in, although it has definite indiepop leanings and talks of '70s and '80s rock and pop stars. Sergeant Buzfuz themselves provide something of a centrepiece with the closing track this year's ace 'Balloons For Thin Linda' album: 'Truth and Lies' is part Harvest Records circa 1971 and part modern indie-folk, but it also has a poignant feel. The most traditional folk here comes courtesy of Slate Islands' 'Internal Exile' which could really have been written and recorded at any time in the past few decades and is a stirring song with a Celtic feel.

Antifolk was a rebellion of sorts, and historically genres such as rock 'n' roll and punk were seen as a reaction to what else was on offer. There are plenty of guitar tunes which owe a debt to those game-changing styles to be found on 'Lucky Dip'. Sheepy have been one of the label's best discoveries, and their anthem to getting messed up, 'Ket Party', removes all of the cheese from what could be described as "pop-punk" with some witty lyrics and load of memorable melodies; 2007's 'Rock 'n' Roll Points' by Filthy Pedro is the kind of scuzzy lo-fi gem that could have grown out of the C86 movement. If conventional, late '70s British punk is your thing then look no further than 'King Of Leyton' by Crash & The Disasters which could be a period piece, and Corporal Machine & The Bombers' 'Five A Day' is cut from the same cloth but both sound fresh rather than dated. One of the label's most prominent bands have been David Cronenberg's Wife, and their Fall-esque track 'Jonny Bentham's Dilemma' is mildly abrasive but with a melodic (if quite dark) heart.

Then there are acts who've successfully experimented with a range of styles. Milk Kan takes more urban sounds, merging an indie-punk attitude with hip-hop, reggae and contagious pop hooks; it's difficult to precisely place Paul Hawkins & The Awkward Silences' 'It Takes A Nation Of Idiots To Hold Me Back' which is another song with something to say and borrows from '80s post-punk and indiepop, as well as folk and more; there's a tropical bent to the Tom Waits meets Kevin Ayres psychedelic pop of 'Sexy Dentist' by Malcolm Kaksois, another early release from 2007.  David Cronenberg's wife appear again as their track 'Sweden' is remixed by Oculus III and transformed into an ambient, psychedelic drone number with a tribal vibe. The wonderfully curious 'Germans In Space' by Dan Edelstyn and the Orchestra Of Cardboard is something of a lost classic with it's odd vocal intonation, cluttered percussion and almost found-sound psychedelic touches.

Perhaps fittingly, Thomas Truax's 2012 track 'March Winds' wraps things up in a stately manner with cinematic strings and a bedtime, lullaby feeling that looks to the future: "the plough keeps on rolling, the river keeps on flowing, can't say where they're going, but I'm going too". It's an apt way to end this section of the journey, a journey that's taken in a lot of different styles and discovered some fantastic bands and musicians. Here's to the first ten years of a truly independent and innovative label, bring on the next!







Blang Records' website

Buy the album





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

Little White Things - Step Back

Article by KevW


Had Little White Things emerged five years ago then they'd be wallowing in press coverage right now. Does that mean they sound dated? No, not at all. In fact, the indie/alt-pop they make feels thoroughly up-to-date, but it comes from a similar place to bands like MGMT and Empire Of The Sun, both of whom were enjoying chart success back then but have fallen off the radar a little now tastes have shifted. The London duo of David Behan & Max Bergstrom do follow in their footsteps though, and 'Step Back' is a first outing that's not to be sniffed at.

The song itself could have been interpreted in many different ways, as its construction is reasonably conventional, it's the production that makes it stand-out. There is a big pop feel to 'Step Back', but it's not overly commercial, preferring to brush past psychedelia and dreampop instead, and do so with no small amount of grandeur and attention to detail. Booming drums, twinkling synths and a soaring set of "oohs" and "aahs" take this to new heights. Had this been the comeback single for either of the aforementioned groups it would be seen as a striking return to form (if perhaps a little too poppy for MGMT) and would likely be on heavy rotation on national radio now, which is exactly what it deserves, and don't be surprised if it happens soon.



Little White Things' website

Buy the single





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook

T/O - White Eyes, Black Signs

Article by KevW


This week sees the release of the debut EP by Strasbourg multi-instrumentalist Théo Cloux who goes by the name T/O, although for live performances the set-up is expanded to a quartet. The four tracks that comprise 'Eyes Above' are described as "lo-fi dream pop", and to be fair, that's pretty much on the money, but there is enough here to differentiate T/O from other similar artists (of which there are plenty). In terms of quality, the songs are decent, but they also vary from one another and don't rely too heavily on distortion to create that dreamy effect, something which can be overused by other acts to disguise a sub-standard tune.

Lead single 'White Eyes, Black Signs' isn't the most upbeat on the EP (not that you can pogo along to the rest of it...) , and perhaps an odd choice as, say, 'Ccolectivee' is more immediate and 'U First' more catchy with its space-funk mannerisms. Is it a good choice nonetheless, because what 'White Eyes...' does is usher you into T/O's dusky world nicely, showing off both the modern bedroom-dreampop leanings and the echoes of '80s synth music that are the essential ingredients to the overall make-up of the record. Plus, as the track builds, it begins to reach new heights that elevate it above other EP cuts. Definitely a good introduction.



T/O's website

Stream the EP in full

Buy the EP





The Sound Of Confusion on Twitter and Facebook