Friday 31 July 2015

Get Me Free #19: Thom Byles - The Great Outdoors

Article by KevW


Much like the New Acoustic Movement fifteen or so years back, alt-folk and alt-country have got themselves rather a bad name in the past half decade or so, and while much of this can be put down to certain acts over-commercialising acoustic music, it would be unfair to tar everyone with the same brush. Admittedly this new single from London-based Thom Byles is likely to get spoken of in the same breath as, say, Bon Iver, but it's worth remembering just what a big compliment that actually is, and also that it's not his fault that the charts are now flooded with people like Ben Howard and Ed Sheeran. To put this in that same bracket as those would be doing it a massive disservice.

'The Great Outdoors' does touch more upon the sounds of the American wilderness than anything British (perhaps due to his Mexican roots?), but as a song (and Byles writes, performs and produces the lot) it's does have a hint of magic and knows how to find the timbre and atmosphere required. Also, with repeat plays, you begin to notice there's more here than meets the eye; different layers begin to peel themselves back, leaving something more than just some moreish harmonies and a full sound that's never too cluttered. Perhaps simple on the surface, 'The Great Outdoors' has plenty of hidden depths as well as being really quite beautiful.



Tom Byles' website




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Wednesday 29 July 2015

Get Me Free #18: Mayflower Madame - Lovesick

Article by KevW


Given that they've only released one EP (2013's 'Into The Haze'), Mayflower Madame seem to be held in high regard, having performed at some of the biggest festivals in their home country of Norway, as well as earning themselves support slots with the likes of Crystal Stilts and Moon Duo. None of this is surprising when you hear their music, which, as you may expect, is a combination of psychedelia, post-punk and drone-rock. The full experience will come later this year when they release their debut album which is currently penciled in for October/November.

The first single lifted from the forthcoming record is 'Lovesick', a dark, eerie, yet actually quite bouncy track that recalls a moody Violent Femmes, The Jesus & Mary Chain and The Dandy Warhols among others. The guitars jangle slightly, the bass bobs away with a certain hypnotic quality, and the vocals are drenched in reverb and give a haunted atmosphere, all to that bouncing beat. But a ferverous instrumental break gives a big psych kick and 'Lovesick' seems to raise itself to another level for a few seconds. If one EP gave the band the opportunities they've had, then an album could see them make yet more inroads. Don't be surprised if you start to hear a lot more about Mayflower Madame very soon.





Mayflower Madame's website





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Tuesday 28 July 2015

Get Me Free #17: The Higher State - Transparent Day

Article by KevW


This cut from The Higher State was originally released as the B-side to 2011 single 'I'll Always Be Around' on Get Hip Recordings, and also appeared on their self-titled compilation album released the same year on State Records, and now, still as something of a rarity, it's been made available for free download. The fact that it's a few years old is hardly likely to make it sound dated, when the whole point of the Kent band is to make "100% authentic folk rock with psychedelic touches, echoing the style of mid 60s West Coast jangle-pop, mixed with harder-edged Texan garage punk and psych".

As anyone who's familiar with their output knows, they take that job description and fulfill it perfectly. In the case of 'Transparent Day', it's really the sound of West Coast jangle-pop that you'll find. It'll be difficult not to mention The Byrds, especially with the adopted guitar sound here, so let's get that out of the way. Harmonies are hardly in short supply either, and, even with the summer currently looking like a bit of a washout, it's almost certain to bring a little sunshine into your life; in fact, it could be made for that purpose alone. A timeless piece.



The Higher State's website

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Monday 27 July 2015

The Baron Four - Walking Out

Article by KevW


The latest 7" from The Baron Four finds them on top form, blasting out the kind of crunching R'n'B that The Yardbirds would be proud of, yet if anything, this is even more raw. 'Walking Out' lays on some blistering guitar, especially for the brief solo, and the beat has a swing that goes from being Ringo one minute, to a flailing Ginger Baker the next. There's a sense of urgency here which is quite compelling and gets your feet stomping. Hovering around in the distance are some backing vocals that add some neat harmonies to the snappy, visceral lead.

Things are toned down just a bit for B-side 'Can't Find My Way' where the jagged riff is exchanged for treble-heavy chords and a more expansive sound as a whole. While 'Walking Out' may be an explosive track, this time they opt for twang and melody that's not dissimilar to fellow revivalists The Raveonettes (minus the fuzz that is). Again the tune is strong and again they nail the sound of those original 45s that inspired them. Another couple of nuggets from a band who always look and sound the part.



The Baron Four's website

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The Beatpack - Where The Water Runs Deep

Article by KevW


If you're new to The Beatpack, then both band name and traditional vinyl sleeve ought to give the game away a bit. State Records motto is "making records that sound like records", and they've always remained true to their words. 'Where The Water Runs Deep' begins with an electrifying riff that's a hybrid of early singles by The Who and The Stones, but specifically when they threw out some of those scorching blues/garage/psych hybrids, and it's a sharp as a razor blade. With some fiery harmonica and a slight freakbeat leaning, it might be a deliberate throwback, but it hits the target right in the middle.

On the flip is '(She's) All Dressed In Black' which also has a Jagger-esque intonation. Really it's too good to be a B-side, so you could easily call this a double A. The Beatpack clearly have a good line in garage riffs, and the mid-section blows out into the soaring sound of original psychedelia. This is a single that could have come from the London scene of the early '60s with bands inspired by the blues and rock 'n' roll floating across from the US, and it would have been an underground classic. Using that term for a pair of songs that rely so heavily on borrowing from the past might be a bit much, but it's still a heck of a listen.



The Beatpack's website

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Get Me Free #16: Rey Pila - Fire Away

Article by KevW


For their new album 'The Future Sugar' (out in September), Mexican band Rey Pila teamed up with Julian Casablancas who co-produced a trio of songs for the record, one of which is opening track and free download single 'Fire Away'. After the first Strokes album, and also throughout his solo work, Casablancas has toyed with retro electronic pop and '80s new-wave, and those influences permeate this track. Even the vocals seem to owe a debt to the The Strokes' frontman. This is not, however, one of his songs, and for all the similar influences and his own input, Rey Pila have their own sound.

On this track in particular, it's the darker electro-pop and new-wave groups that they use as potential fuel, borrowing synths from Soft Cell, bleeps and bloops from certain Giorgio Moroder produced material, and an almost industrial coldness that could be inspired by Kraftwerk. When you merge these with those muscular, slightly doughy vocals then you have a patchwork that will remind you of a lot of different things (the intro could even be early La Roux) yet not anyone that you can directly put your finger on. 'Fire Away' borrows from all over the place, but when put into the melting-pot that is Rey Pila's collective minds, they come away with something individual.



Rey Pila's website

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Sunday 26 July 2015

Peluché - The Guy With The Gammy Eye

Article by KevW


Speedy Wunderground have "speedy" in their name for a reason: the label insist that each song they release be recorded in a single day. With Peluché, though, this no messing approach was taken to another level. It was in less than a week that they heard this track from the London trio, caught them live, got them in the studio, and had the tapes off to the pressing plant. You may expect such haste to come at some expense to the music, but that's not so in this instance. 'The Guy With The Gammy Eye' isn't lo-fi, it isn't deliberately demo-like, in fact it contains a lot of depth and attention to detail, so much so that you can find something new each time you hear it.

Classification isn't easy, but if you think along the lines of conventional dreampop mixed with Stereolab and Bjork then you'll begin to build a picture. It's all calm, ethereal, reverberating guitars and heavenly sighs at the beginning, but the guitar motif picks up the pace just before the kooky vocals hit and from there on in the rhythm section clicks into gear and drives the song forward with an insatiable lust to build and build. Strange sounds pepper 'The Guy With The Gammy Eye' and make an already unusual (but quite beautiful) song even more otherworldly. There's more invention here than in some bands' entire back-catalogues.


Peluché's website

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Moxie Kicks - So Alive

Article by KevW


Many bands come with interesting backstories, sometimes they're true and sometimes not. Some bands hype themselves to high Heaven even before they've released a record. It all tends to come out in the wash. A prime example of this backfiring is Razorlight's hilarious first press release (if you haven't read it, it's here, and it's really quite something!). London duo Moxie Kicks also have a backstory and they're also bigging themselves up, with their Facebook bio using words such as "sensational", "exciting", "innovative" and proclaiming them "definitely one to watch". Sure there's nothing wrong with being self-assured, although it can occasionally be a little off-putting, and such statements are usually best ignored until you've seen or heard the artist in question. The proof, as they say, is in the pudding.

Moxie Kicks haven't got to the pudding yet, they're just serving up a starter, an entrée if you will, but their plan is for each single to come with a proper video, and that every track of theirs will sound like a single. It's quite a task and they've already given themselves a lot to live up to. So, how have they fared with the first course? Pretty darn well, thank you very much! 'So Alive' is confident, it's got a blockbusting sound and a great melody, and thankfully, all the bravado is left on paper; this isn't a song that tries too hard or over-eggs the pudding (Viva Brother showed us exactly what can happen when that approach is taken). Yes, this is fairly conventional indie-rock, but you can imagine a sound like this bringing the pair the commercial success they seem to expect. Time will tell, but we might just have a band who can live up to their own hype. Definitely one to watch? We'd go along with that.



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Get Me Free #15: Timeslides - Get Well Soon

Article by KevW


In terms of sound and melodic style, London band Timeslides are not dissimilar to shoegazers Ceremony, the main difference being that they offer a slightly less jarring attack of fuzz, as though Ceremony's rough edges have been sanded down to become a little smoother. Any comparison to the unsung Virginian heroes generally means the music in question is well worth a listen, and it's no different in this instance, because not only does 'Get Well Soon' boast a great sound, it's also a quality tune to boot.

So you should know to expect: a pounding beat, the continual sound of static humming from the speakers, a vocal that doesn't attempt any ridiculous histrionics, and a simple, classic and infectious melody. Oh, and lots of guitar. There's the merest hint of New Order in places, but you certainly couldn't get the two mixed up. With so little information on the band available (they're two members of Crash Island is all we have), and so few songs posted (just two as far as we can tell), it's difficult to know if the style they've adopted here is their chosen route or a one-off, but they've delivered a wonderful track in 'Get Well Soon', so let's hope they don't go changing too much.



Timeslides' website





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Saturday 25 July 2015

Eliza And The Bear - Lion's Heart

Article by KevW


We've been covering Eliza and the Bear since their debut single back in 2012, and it's always interesting to see how bands develop and progress. Some only hang around for a while, but others seem intent to stay the distance, and this is one group who've always given the impression that they wouldn't be a flash in the pan. Back then they sounded like the finished product, not a work in progress, and each passing release has reaffirmed this. New single 'Lion's Heart' (out on Monday) is more expertly-crafted indie/pop perfection.

Flooded with melody and sparkling with piano and guitar, 'Lion's Heart' is uplifting, optimistic and grandiose. The antithesis of lo-fi indiepop, Eliza and the Bear don't scrimp on the production; this is designed to sound as good as possible, and while too much gloss can be sickly, certain songs command nothing less than perfection. So with the blast of some horns and the sweep of strings, 'Lion's Heart' is a full-blown aural experience with hidden depths as well as being an instant hit. Proud and big without being overblown and pompous, Eliza and the Bear have just gone from strength to strength.



Eliza and the Bear's website

Catch them live:

Reading Festival Fri 28 August
Leeds Festival Sat 29 August
Manchester Club Academy Thu 01 October
Glasgow Stereo Fri 02 October
Newcastle Think Tank Sat 03 October
Leeds Brudenell Social Club Mon 05 October
Bristol Fleece Thu 06 October
London Koko Wed 07 October
Birmingham O2 Academy 2 Fri 09 October
Brighton The Haunt Sat 10 October





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Get Me Free #14: Monotony - Back To The Castle

Article by KevW


The story behind Monotony is one many bands can only dream about. They formed last summer and wrote five songs in an hour, recorded them in a day and uploaded them. Somehow the tunes found their way to Marc Riley who started giving them some heavy rotation on his 6 Music show. Sounds all a bit too easy, doesn't it? Their links with Sauna Youth will have helped though. The thing with Monotony is that they're one of those bands who you'll either love or hate, and if you love them you won't be able to get enough. Six tracks have so far been released on limited cassette and download, but next month you'll be able to get them all on 12" as well - and the side-B of the record features the same six songs over again for those who really can't get enough. Monotony indeed.

Described accurately as "simplistic dirge punk", 'Back To The Castle' sounds live, very raw and as though their equipment doesn't quite have enough beef to be able to handle the music they hammer through it. The riff is simple and it is monotonous, but it works. Similarly, the vocals don't seem to stretch beyond two or three notes, making for something of a compressed, angry version of drone-rock. Distortion seeps out of every pore of the song and if played loudly this is bound to piss off the neighbours. The way music is written and recorded doesn't have to be complex or require virtuoso skills, you just need a sound, an identity and some good tunes (preferably all of your own), and Monotony fit that criteria - or they will for some people at least. Got a Saturday morning hangover? Try this out with headphones on; it'll either kill or cure.



Download 'Back To The Castle for free by heading here

Monotony's website

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Friday 24 July 2015

Flemmings - Shake Well Before Use

Article by KevW


Four tracks, eight minutes. Kerpow. There's no fluff or messing about when it comes to this new tape from trans European trio Flemmings (who boast members from Spain, Denmark and England). 'Get Away From Me Right Now' is classic scuzzy powerpop with a tasty melody and a raw yet not totally untamed energy. There's no needless shouting or attempts at any form of shock value, it's just a great tune and sets the tone nicely. If you do like a bit more unleashed, flailing, speedball punk then it comes in a handy forty-seven second package titled 'I'm Afraid I'm A Jerk', and it's custom built for nosebleed pogoing.

Sitting somewhere in the middle of the two sound-wise is the buzzsaw guitar-pop of 'So' which will tick all your lo-fi boxes. Lastly comes 'Stone Circle' which once more takes a slightly messy but melodic approach and is reminiscent of mid-'90s alternative types such as AC Acoustics, only with a little more anger in the vocals. This might be a blink-and-you'll-miss-it collection, but for sheer enthusiasm and a heap of fun it's worth every penny. Shake well before use, but prepare to be shaken during use as well.



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Memory Maze - The Closest Thing To Heaven

Article by KevW


This very month last year was when the music of London-based musician/producer Gavin Ellis, otherwise known as Memory Maze, first landed in our inbox and got us rather excited. That single was the dreamy electronic indiepop of 'Like A Mirage' and sounded like a less surreal, more wide-eyed MGMT. It's interesting to see what, if any, changes have been made in the past twelve months, and we'll find out properly in mid-August when debut album 'From The Outside In' will be released. Before that though, we can savour the very fetching new single 'The Closest Thing To Heaven' which is available from July 31st.

It's not poles apart from 'Like A Mirage', but there is a clear difference. Once more this is a song full of swoonsome wonder and again it's essentially electronic indiepop, but the tempo is raised with an propelling beat that could be by Neu! travelling at high speeds down the autobahn. The vocals sigh and croon softly whilst washes of synth and retro electronics give the full-on wall of sound effect. Throw in some chimes of guitar that feel like shards of glass glinting in the sunlight and you've got your perfect alternative pop hit for the summer. Close to Heaven indeed.



Memory Maze's website

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Get Me Free #13: North Atlantic Maritime - Wrecks

Article by KevW


With a name and track title like these, you'd be forgiven for thinking that North Atlantic Maritime were an entirely nautical concept, but that's not quite true. Formed as a duo in 2014, their first single, 'Mt.', was a non sea-based instrumental that took hold of post-rock and got rid of the boring bits. But, having previously been based in Brighton and now living in London, the coast was never far away, so perhaps its influence was likely to creep into song names as well as the band's (they're now expanded to a trio) chosen moniker. So we get 'Wrecks' as the follow-up, and the cover is even ordained with a shot of the ocean.

If you knew nothing about band or single and hadn't seen the video, then musically you'd find that the aforementioned theme doesn't make an appearance. There are no lyrics once again, and so your imagination can be left to paint its own picture of what the song may be inspired by. Taking their urgent post-rock style a step further, North Atlantic Maritime flood the song with guitars and drums that sound as though they're careering out of control towards the edge of a cliff. There's the faintest hint of surf twang here too, and a touch of math-rock, but really it seems as though these guys want to paint instrumental soundscapes that aren't strung out over several minutes and don't take a dozen plays to appreciate. With the thunderous rumble, it's clear that they're not in calm waters, but we hope their good ship continues its voyage for a while longer yet.





North Atlantic Maritime's website

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Thursday 23 July 2015

bikos - Bikos S/T

Article by KevW


Does a band's lifespan (outside the mega bands and artists who will pack out arenas until they drop dead) depend as much on the same factors as it used to? So many groups are with us for a couple of albums and then seem to fade away, leaving a couple of classic tracks and a lot more that are forgotten. There are three main reasons why this has happened in the past. Firstly, trends can often last just a couple of years before the industry and public move on to different sounds. You either need to adapt to keep interest high (The Beatles, for example), or peddle the same old material until it wears too thing (their initially-as-big-selling contemporaries Herman's Hermits). Secondly, the artists themselves can feel the need to move on and quit at the top (Paul Weller disbanded The Jam in his mid-twenties with their final single entering the charts at number one). Thirdly is the classic "musical differences" (The Stone Roses would likely have made more than two albums if they remained friends). Nowadays, things are different. The medium by which we consume music has changed and centres more around the listener than the industry, so while there may still be fads and crazes, they could stay around much longer; there's no need to keep trying to define the zeitgeist anymore. The shoegaze revival has lasted longer than it's initial run, likewise '80s style synth-pop shows no sign of going away. So will bikos continue with their jagged, jittery guitar-pop that previously would have made them sound sooo 2010, or will they adapt? Now that it matters less, the choice is theirs, and unless they just repeat the same old tricks and yield diminishing returns, they'll still have a market.

The answer is a little bit of both. For starters, opening track 'Invocation' doesn't sound like the band we knew before. It has a slacker-rock vibe but is essentially an ambient forerunner to what follows, and what follows is 'New In Town' which shows hints of the jittery guitar band we knew before, but they're taking their writing a bit further and come up with something more soulful, and that's in part thanks to the female lead vocal. In a way, this track is a handy summary of what 'Bikos S/T' involves. The snappy vocals of Gabe Pearlman will always give the game away though, even on the excellent 'E.M.N.P/Modern Props' which is thrust through with more power than some of the band's other work - you could say it's less flimsy - but tinkling indiepop undertones are still present and correct. The clue is in the title of 'Secretly Happy', as it sounds anything but cheerful, with a menacing, downbeat start and lyrics about being "tired and weary", but the swooning backing vocals begin to elevate it and then one of those angular guitar lines joins in for temporary respite. Such changes are a continual feature of this album.

There's little change on certain tunes. For example, 'Ask If You Can' is their classic sound with added piano; 'Very Yes/Barely Know' doesn't break form much yet is actually a contagious highlight. 'Dollface Plus Robot Body' is unmistakably bikos and would have sat nicely on either of their other albums, however, they do show more ambition, pushing the song well past the five-minute mark without repetition. It's not the only song to do so either (although it is followed by the 36-second instrumental 'The Divide, It's OK'), with 'Best Of 2008' taking its more classic soul-pop sound over six-minutes and again switching sound slightly to prevent boredom setting in, becoming a southern blues-rock number for a period. Touches of Belle & Sebastian style indiepop abound on 'Lady Is The New Guy', but it's as if they were in cahoots with Talking Heads.

It's worth mentioning the extended lengths to show the progression; only once have the band previously released anything of this size, generally hovering around conventional indie/pop song lengths of three or four minutes. Even when they keep to this convention the sound is different, such as on 'It's Post-Prom' which could be mistaken for a number of Scandinavian guitar bands. 'Tough Cookie' is in a very similar vein, aside from the jaunty chorus, and contains a neat tempo change. More soul (and a touch of jazz) can be found on 'Your Case Helps', which leads into something of an epic last track in 'Re-Replaying/Awkward', where a cheery tune is married to lyrics that are sometimes anything but. It reaffirms the way that these songs chop, change and experiment. bikos appear to have set out to make their most ambitious record yet and really tried to push themselves. They're not the first band to do so by a long shot, but where so many other falter and run the risk of alienating existing fans and losing press attention, they've succeeded in their endeavour and given us their finest collection thus far. They just need to keep the dreaded "musical differences" at bay...







bikos' website

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Trembling Bells - Sovereign Self

Article by James Grimshaw


'Sovereign Self' is the fourth album by Glaswegian seven-piece Trembling Bells, and it represents a very particular sort of musical revival. The sounds of the '60s permeate the band and record, with production, instrumentation and practise all pointing to a murkier, driftier time for the term "folk". The album is populated by electric organs, guitars, strings and percussion that co-align to evoke the deep, the dark, the pastoral and the post-conscious, while Lavinia Blackwall’s operatic vocals guide the listener through the album’s resulting river. Album opener ‘Tween the Womb and the Tomb’ stands as a perfect example, with sheaves and shimmers of reverbed strings and bells swimming alongside before descending into a glorious, indulgent electric-organic hell.

Sometimes the river can get a little too murky, though – each constituent part of the album’s heavier moments is so packed with information and intrigue that the overall piece suffers a little. ‘Sweet Death of Polka’ pulls you in to a world of interlaced instruments and effects which builds and builds until you get lost; ‘Bells of Burford’’s 5/4 organ riff, while inspired, tugs at your shirtsleeves impatiently while you’re trying to follow Blackwall’s sonorous melody. While 'Sovereign Self' is on the whole a noisy, chaotic affair, the listener truly revels in most of it. ‘O Where Is St George’ sees the tenets of folk warming up in clatter-sound before a refreshingly raw choir of band vocals and warm, clean electric guitar, while ‘Bells of Burford’’s pace and tone is refreshing and contagious.
There are hints and shapes of quiet inbetween the all-out noise, found in Fleet Foxes guitar tones and undertoned lushness by way of the well-constructed backline. The album’s true quiet moment comes with ‘The Singing Blood’, an honest-to-goodness ballad peppered with bluesy twang and Dylan-esque vocals, that reminds of a calmer Comets On Fire.

'Sovereign Self' ends on a high with ‘Is Someone Else’, a speedy, hefty sibling of ‘Bells of Burford’ which once again sees Blackwall’s vocals pull taught the underlying chaos of guitar growls and organ drones. Even in the decidedly '60s sound they pursue, modern referents and influences are there to be found; Trembling Bells resemble Anna Calvi at times in their tone, embodying a grandiose flourish of complete catharsis. Their forays into full-on folk-rock are predicated on feeling, and enacted with it to boot. 'Sovereign Self' is a meal, to be sure: tiring at a point, but second winds are not far off, and reaching the end is deeply satisfying.





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Get Me Free #12: Natalie Pryce - Derek Scott

Article by KevW


As you may already be aware, Glasgow's Natalie Pryce are not a solo artist, they're a band - none of whom are called Natalie, they're all men. So now any possible confusion in that respect is gone, you might want to have a listen to 'Derek Scott' which is lifted from their album 'Vol. II: The Ascent from Ego to Ego', released earlier this year. The track is now being given some stand-alone publicity thanks to a new, flickery, surreal video which you can watch below before downloading the track for free (or even the entire album, on which every track is a human name, for free should you so wish).

The track itself is also slightly surreal and generates a fuzz-laden, seemingly lo-fi atmosphere whilst actually being a well-produced, stomping blues-rock song at heart. The lyrics are partially indecipherable thanks to the crazed vocal style, but the clattering beat, bursts of harmonica and loads of frazzled guitar give 'Derek Scott' an air of mystery and danger, perhaps not unlike the album cover you can see above. It's a storming ride though, so check out the visuals and give the rest of the album a spin afterwards.





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Wednesday 22 July 2015

Moa Bones - Spun

Article by James Grimshaw


The singularly small-minded compulsion to invoke the Greek financial crisis in discussion of Moa Bones’ sophomore album is one I’ve been wrestling with in the composition of this review, unfair as it is to the artist and music with which the troubles bear little figurative relation. It is with trembling hands, then, that I let go of the news, and all of the smarmy lines I could have drawn from recession to singer-songwriter (however clever they might have been), and instead pull focus to the rightful protagonist of this piece: Moa Bones, a.k.a.: Dimitris Aronis. 'Spun' was entirely written, produced and recorded by the man behind the nom-de-plume in his Athens bedroom between the months of August 2014 and January 2015, with the exception of some guest harmonica on one track. From this decidedly lo-fi approach, one might usually expect the kinds of hiss, fuzz and smothering reverbs you’d find in a Youth Lagoon demo or a poorly-mixed Grouper album. But Aronis manages instead to produce an unanticipated freshness, where the drums sizzle, vocals float and instruments reside in their own special places; he sidesteps the murky precepts of his contemporaries.

A perhaps unwanted side effect of that is that attention is brought specifically to the production. The more obvious lo-fi moments can no longer be considered artistic quirks but instead genuine mistakes; to strive for the clear, sharp sound that Aronis does is to aim for a certain professional standard which sadly cannot be reached in a bedroom, and isn’t reached by 'Spun'. It’s a small thing, but 'Spun' is caught in an unfortunate catch-22: too well-produced to be truly, enjoyable lo-fi; too lo-fi to be audiophilically slavered over. The album is interlaced with a certain bluesy swank, shifted into a major key and often brings to mind an impassioned Paolo Nutini rabbit-hopping before the microphone. Indeed, much of the album seems to take notes from the excitable pop star – 'Spun'’s opener ‘The Journey’ is a bombastic start, subsuming the riches-to-rags blues-storytelling tradition in the poppy gloss of his production, while later track ‘Hey’ rests on the swing-folk stereotypes through which Nutini is perhaps best understood, bringing in some good old-fashioned bluegrass and calling to mind a well-adjusted nephew of Seasick Steve.

Between and beyond these two tracks, though, are thoroughly darker moments in the music. ‘Take It All Away’ is an album highlight; it swings and swoons with the laze of Howling Bells and the grumble of Mark Lanegan, building into a dense wall of instrumentation drawing Phil Spector’s loudest to mind. ‘Long For A Change’, ‘Skopelitis’ and ‘Come On’ signify a gear-shit down into stripped singer-songwriter fare, each demonstrating a certain competence – ‘Come On’ is another album highlight in its tenderness of concept and construction. It is with these quieter moments that Aronis’ production is most flattering, as vocal harmonies and organ accompaniments elicit a warmth not found in those Spector-moments that pepper the work. Closing track ‘Wake Up’ is a hopeful song, with the ochre of '60s Americana muddled in with modern taste. In all, 'Spun' is an odd one. At times it can be a little saccharine, but these times are made up for by moments of genuine and unique inspiration. It’s a promising sophomore, for sure.



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Vukovar - Emperor

Article by KevW


Many bands are built around songwriting partnerships, and Wigan collective Vukovar (who, for some reason, have chosen to take their name from a Croatian port city) are no different, being based around the work of tunesmiths Dan Shea and Rick Clarke. No doubt the rest of the group will have had input at points too, especially as many of them are making guest appearances from other better known bands, but what really shows on their debut album 'Emperor', is the range of influences and styles they delve into, flitting from one to the next without a second glance. Naturally, a record made this way will leave different people having different favourite tracks, but as a body of work it stands up well, with a few real standouts whatever your taste. Admittedly, when we talk about different styles, they could all fit somewhere into the indie/lo-fi/grunge/alt-rock spectrum, so this isn't as fractured as it could be, but it does keep your attention well by changing gear several times, and this is in part thanks to the size of the group of musicians and studio boffins involved.

Opening track, 'Silent, Almost Sleeping', would fit the lo-fi bracket but toys unexpectedly with becoming a folk dirge as reimagined by The Lemonheads ('90s alt-rock and college-rock is never far away). At a lofty six-minutes, the brooding post-punk of 'Regular Patrons Of The Salon Kitty' touches on psych-rock and really shows the diversity that hallmarks the band, then they change again for the frantic, electronic scuzz of 'Lose My Breath' which stalks you throughout its two-minute duration. Another even shorter tune appears in the beautifully sung and spaciously produced 'Part 1: Ms. Kuroda's Lament' and sits right between their ability to create genuine alternative anthems and hidden gems. The title of 'R'duced' is likely a pun in itself, but the music is dark, disjointed and moody, almost like a faltering mind struggling to process information properly. Final track 'The Staircase' is a patchwork of found sounds, spoken word and unusual percussion, and is generally very unhinged, with layers overlapping and creating an odd form of discordant psychedelia.

For more instant likability then 'Koen Cohen K.' is perfect outsider pop with a chorus that elevates it above much of the album; it's the first of several potential singles. Perhaps 'Nero's Felines' could be considered another, as it introduces itself like something Nirvana might have created but again has a (this time wordless) chorus that sticks easily, and 'Concrete' comes over like a screaming version of The Cramps, just tidied up enough to open them up to a wider audience; it's a fine modern garage song. Floating, drifting guitars abound on 'No Guilt Felt' which is like Tom Waits on a downer to begin, but hurtles into a whole new section before slamming to a halt and then starting again. It's been something of a journey by the time you hit 'The New World Order', but it's here that Vukovar are at their most accessible, and they manage this without compromising their vision or even shying away from the alternative world in favour of the mainstream; this is purely and simply a catchy, well-written and instantly likable track that wouldn't be out of place on radio stations that are even slightly more adventurous than usual. The whole of 'Emperor' shows a multitude of talents and also several potential avenues to pursue on future releases (which, judging by lyrical content, will have some form of political undertone), and it's a great way to start out.







Vukovar's website

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Get Me Free #11: Cancellieri - Education

Article by KevW


A few years ago we had whole fleets of Foxes sound-alikes sailing across the ocean, before our very own Mr. Mumford and his chums took British folk and gave it a pop sheen. Since then you haven't been able to walk down the charts without tripping over some bloke with a guitar making songs that will pocket a fortune on TV ads before too long. So how come self confessed Americana singer-songwriter Cancellieri is bucking the trend by turning up with tunes as good as 'Education'?

I guess that's a secret for the Colorado musician to know and us to find out, but he's been managing to get some very respectable comparisons (Neil Young, Elliot Smith, Bon Iver...) while he's been at it, and you only have to play this to see why. Yes, 'Education' is downbeat and melancholy, but with the echoing guitar at the forefront, backed by occasional strings that cold be from 'Astral Weeks', and a voice that's as silky as bathing in a bath of melted chocolate and as haunting and full of feeling as a million emotion-filled movie scenes, the stage is set for new album '46 And Raleigh'. It could be amazing.



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Tuesday 21 July 2015

Nolita View - Departed

Article by KevW


South London's Nolita View have always been interesting, and at first this was because we knew nothing about them. After a friendly chat about 18 months back we learned more, including who they'd been listening to (The War On Drugs, The National, Talking Heads...) as well as the band they're most often compared to (Phoenix). Listening to new single 'Departed' you can hear elements of pretty much all of the above, but, interestingly, least of all is Phoenix. Quite nicely labelled by the band themselves as "Stadium Krautrock", there is a slight difference to their sound on this one.

The term itself is all but null and void, with just the faintest hint of a motorik beat giving a krautrock drive, but only if you squint a bit, and perhaps only the chiming guitars and big chorus sending them anywhere near "stadium" levels, which is no bad thing; this band are not Muse. What we do have is a post-punky pop song that propels itself well, sticks in the mind and shows a genuine progression. With this insistent nature and memorable choruses, this new "Stadium Krautrock" tag (if we're to call it that) might just serve them very well.





Nolita View's website





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Get Me Free #10: Black Tiger Palace - ReignForest

Article by KevW


You all know Black Tiger Palace, right? If you've just answered that question, "no", then we can't really help besides passing on one of their songs. Despite searching the all-knowing internet, we can only really find stuff about rare large cats, so who he/she/they is/are will remain a mystery for now, but then perhaps that's exactly how they want it. Any kind of location has also eluded us, as have further web links besides a SoundCloud page streaming four songs.

As they submitted the artwork for a new EP (which, judging by the cover, is called 'Nightwork'), we do know that all four songs on said page are included and are difficult to split on merit alone. Really it comes down to personal preference, but 'ReignForest' perhaps best encapsulates the low-range frequencies and deep, weighty electronica that Black Tiger Palace create. With a sampled voice cutting through the darkness, it also offers a nice contrast. There are several genres you could lump this into, from EDM to deep house, but as they appear to enjoy being enigmatic, we won't force them into a corner, just enjoy these heavy atmospherics instead.



Black Tiger Palace's website





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Monday 20 July 2015

Skymningslandet - Skymningslandet

Article by KevW


Depending on exactly how you translate it, Skymningslandet means "twilight land", or possibly sunset/receding. I guess that means we should expect something a little dusky from this group of Swedes - all of whom have been/are involved in other musical ventures alongside Skymningslandet. In truth, there's as much bleary-eyed, daytime light to be found on their self-titled album as anything else, although some songs, such as the spooky closer 'Drömmen' are a little darker. Perhaps most notable, or certainly most immediate, of the songs included is 'Genom fönstret' which opens the album by digging into space-rock and instrumental psychedelia, all with classical undertones of an eerie nature (perhaps think Bach or Handel) which continue through a sizable chunk of the album.

It's a similar story with 'Mortimer', another of the more uptempo tracks that sits at the crossroads between prog and psychedelia, but once again with that haunting organ sound throughout. As we get to the heart of 'Skymningslandet', essentially from 'Ballongen' to 'Hit men inte längre', the pace drops and for the most part so does the haunted atmosphere; the former track in particular being lighter in tone and perhaps more suited to a sunrise than sunset. The second of the aforementioned pair of songs is again lighter in texture even if the music retains the creepy organ and lets it play over a loose groove.

The very centre of the record couldn't exactly be described as a low, at least not in terms of quality, but it is perhaps less engaging upon first listen than the rest, preferring to deliver well-composed ambient pieces, with 'Skylar' in particular fitting this description. It flows neatly into 'Under Vattnet' which introduces a slightly rougher edge thanks to some buzzing guitar, but that atmosphere remains much the same, preventing the album becoming fractured. If you had to pick one song to sum up the sound of 'Skymningslandet' in one go, then 'Skimmer' would be your best bet, being an amalgamation of all we've heard from them so far. Instrumental albums, especially those with ambient leanings, can often be a little dull, but there's more than enough here to get stuck into.







Skymningslandet's website

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Get Me Free #9: Junkyard Choir - Sun Moon Stars

Article by KevW


Junkyard Choir aren't the first band to try and fuse country with punk, and they surely won't be the last. As a rule (there are exceptions, of course) the results of such genre-splicing have been questionable at best. New single 'Sun Moon Stars' (which is lifted from the album 'Let Sleeping Dogs Lie' from earlier this year) is that it succeeds in being a proper, southern-fried, gravel-throated thrash of chunky guitar riffs, flailing drums and lyrics about whiskey without ever seeming like pretense, forced, stereotypical bluesy desert-rock as you may expect.

That makes it even odder, then, that Junkyard Choir are two blokes from Brighton. Yep, the Brighton in England. Which I guess still makes then southern, right? They, like others before them, have shown that you don't have to be from a certain location or living a certain lifestyle to be able to write songs about it, although it can help, naturally. 'Sun Moon Stars' is a furious, heavy, swinging stomp whoever the heck it's by. Proof once more that you don't need a certain passport to make great tunes.



Download 'Sun Moon Stars' for free by heading here

Junkyard Choir's website





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Sunday 19 July 2015

Get Me Free #8: The Luck Of Eden Hall - Arthropoda Lepidoptra

Article by KevW


It's an exciting time for Chicago band The Luck Of Eden Hall. Not only will the end of the summer see them putting the finishing touches to new album 'The Acceleration Of Time', but before that comes a slot supporting The Psychedelic Furs. The gigs and recording don't stop there though, as the quartet will be heading across the ocean for their second UK tour which begins at the end of July and will also involve the recording of a live album in the process. A full list of dates is below if you want to catch them , and we'd advise you do.

Varying in style from upbeat psych-rock to more ambient dreampop, The Luck Of Eden have the ability to flit between styles without ever sounding forced. Take glorious freebie 'Arthropoda Lepidoptra' for example. This is sunkissed psychedelia that's as easy going as early Pink Floyd and a match for some of the world's finest dreampop groups. With a definite '60s vibe, the bluesy guitar solo adds an extra dimension and you find yourself in a woozy wonderland that you can really get lost in. Very fine work.


Catch them live:

July 25 @ Shakespeare’s Pub, Kalamazoo Michigan
July 30 @ 12 Bar Club, London England
Aug 1 @ The Rocking Chair, Sheffield England
Aug 2 @ Radfest, Wales
Aug 3, 4, 5 @ MWNCI Studios Wales, recording a live album for Fruits de Mer Records
Aug 6 @ Bannerman’s, Edinburgh Scotland
Aug 7 @ Nice n’ Sleazys, Glasgow Scotland
Aug 8 @ The Magnet, Liverpool England
Aug 9 @ 13th Dream of Dr. Sardonicus Festival, Cardigan Wales
Aug 11 @ The Half Moon, A Seance At Syd’s book release show, London England
Aug 29 @ Backlot Bash w/ The Psychedelic Furs, Skokie Illinois

The Luck Of Eden Hall's website





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Get Me Free #7: weird. - Summerbliss

Article by KevW


'Summerbliss' is one of those songs which pretty much manages to describe itself using just one word - especially if you add the artwork too. weird. are from Rome and, as the title suggests, 'Summerbliss' is soothing, relaxing and perfect for this time of year. It's also very good, which, really, is the main thing. The whole name might scream "dreampop!" at you, and that tag definitely fits, but it crosses into other realms too.

Both vocally and atmospherically, this is a song that recalls the early work of The Verve before they went a bit too laddish and while they weren't trying to be too anthemic. The spangly guitar intro lights up the song, and then the soft beat carries it as vocals drift by in the background. It picks up as it goes along, but never too much; it continuously focuses on the job in hand and achieves its goals. And that cover it a great shot.



weird's website





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Friday 17 July 2015

Get Me Free #6: Youceff Kabal - Two Halves

Article by KevW


On his current EP 'El Yunque', Arizonan musician Youceff Kabal delivers a platter of ambient soundscapes (not the boring variety where nothing much actually happens) along with a modern form of dreampop that's fairly upbeat and easily absorbed, whilst also being so laid-back it might as well be sipping a cocktail in the pool on a lilo. You could put 'El Yunque' in the same bracket as jj in the way it absorbs more tropical influences. All six tracks are worth investigating, and all are available as  a name-your-price download, but maybe shining that bit brightest is opener 'Two Halves'.

It's the most abrasive song here (although using the word "abrasive" is pushing it; this is chilled to perfection and still made for relaxing to in the sun), which perhaps makes it the most immediate too. Along with a repetitive, almost spidery guitar line, are shuffling beats, soft vocals and what sound as though they began life as jagged edges, only to be gradually eroded into the smoother forms they now occupy. Arizona must be a pretty hot place this time of year, and it sounds like the heat has gone to Youceff Kabal's head; 'Two Halves' feels as though you've just jumped into a pool for refreshment, and it's a great feeling.



Youceff Kabal's website

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Thursday 16 July 2015

Get Me Free #5: Schmieds Puls - You Can Go Now

Article by KevW


There's a reason why a lot of songs start quietly and gradually build into something more substantial. Having a huge, climatic beginning and then slowly fading away over three or four minutes doesn't really have the desired effect. Now signed to Austrian label Seayou Records, Schmieds Puls offer a prime example of just why. Left completely free of all effects (or as they say, "no bells and whistles"), what you're hearing is the song laid bare in front of you. With a certain fragility that suits the basic guitar and vocals intro, and despite moving from loud sections to quieter moments, the first half of 'You Can Go Now' is left almost skeletal and it works wonderfully.

There's plenty of heartbreak and sadness to that voice too, a certain resignation almost. The guitar does grow louder to enhance this rollercoaster of emotions at times, but it's not until the drums and backing vocals join in that any great change takes place, and even then it's done in a subtle and simple way, letting the song speak for itself rather than smothering it. 'You Can Go Now' is an emotion-filled teaser for their second album 'I Care A Little Less About Everything Now' which is out on October 18th.





Schmieds Puls' website

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Wednesday 15 July 2015

Get Me Free #4: Jacuzzi Boys - Happy Damage

Article by KevW


"Are you guys musicians?"
"Yeah."
"What band, or what group, what's your name?"
"We're called Jacuzzi Boys."
"Jacubbi Boys?"
"Jacuzzi."
"Jac-u-zzi!"
"Yeah."
"Boys."
"Yeah."
"So you're local?"
"From Miami, Florida."
"No kidding! What are you doing all the way up here?"
"Touring."
"Really? How cool! What kind of music do you play?"
"Rock 'n' roll."
"Rock 'n' roll! Yeah!"

And so goes one lady's introduction to to Jacuzzi Boys, as Judge Judy flickers on a TV screen in the background. I hope she likes buzz-saw guitars, walls of noise, feedback and a heap of melody, because if so, and assuming she hung around for the gig, she'd watch these slightly unkempt heroes tearing a venue apart by the brute force of their own energy. From their forthcoming EP of the same name, 'Happy Damage' is an instant success that borrows from a good thirty years of US alt-rock and still has a life all of its own. It's little wonder that Jacuzzi Boys have built such a following by now - they make pop songs shot through with a lovable, roguish charm and more enthusiasm than a puppy with a new cuddly toy to rip to shreds. Happy? Definitely! Damage? Likely to occur if you spend to long in the mosh pit. The most fitting word, though, is "fun". And lots of it.




Jacuzzi Boys' website





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Tuesday 14 July 2015

Get Me Free #3: Jonny Debt - Waiting "Love"

Article by KevW


'Waiting "Love"' is the fifth single from Canadian musician Jonny Debt and is slightly deceiving at first, beginning as though we're in for a traditional alt-country slowie, but the crunchy guitars give a peek at what's to come. That vibe never completely vanishes, but as soon as the chorus hits we're firmly in alt-rock territory as more fuzzy guitar joins in, along with drums and handclaps, making for an upbeat stomper that doesn't really require repeat listens to grab you; it's instantly likeable.

There are definite earworm qualities too, ensuring that the song sticks in your head for a good while after it's finished, without ever becoming nagging or annoying, and getting that balance right is a skill in itself. 'Waiting "Love' is pretty timeless, very memorable and the perfect length for a track with those characteristics, and at a cost of nothing, you can't really go wrong.



Johnny Debt's website





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Monday 13 July 2015

Slow Riot - City Of Culture

Article by KevW


Statements of intent are always useful when it comes to your debut single, and Irish band Slow Riot have certainly made one here. Grabbing the post-rock bull by its horns, they build this track to a ferocious climax that borders on grunge (when you read that their list of influences ranges from Gang Of Four to Future Of The Left it actually all makes sense). 'City Of Culture' is an ode to their hometown of Limerick which was awarded the title in 2014, although this isn't overtly obvious in the lyrics, and neither is the fact that they consider the award a good or bad thing.

With Bunnymen guitars and Joy Division vocals for the verses, 'City Of Culture' is a powerhouse of a tune, sounding more like a band at the peak of their powers than just starting out. The energy only intensifies in the chorus, as that voice switches closer to a scream with the continuous pounding of the rhythm section anchoring everything in place. A squalling guitar solo sees the real change from that dark and brooding atmosphere to something more modern and visceral. Just listening to the ending is enough to give you a sore throat, so singing it must require pipes of steel. Definitely a band to stick in your ones to watch list.



Slow Riot's website

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Get Me Free #2: Stolen Jars - Kept

Article by KevW


Indulging in a life of crime isn't something we'd endorse, but if you're going to do so, then at least try and keep it low-key and not that intrusive. Yeah, some people get their kicks from stealing cars or whatever, but not this New Jersey band, who appear to opt for a much less expensive and hazardous form of theft. OK, so it probably is actually very unlikely that Stolen Jars got their name from a particular habit they have, but it's a nice concept.

It's been ages since their self-titled debut album back in 2011, but a new LP, 'Kept', will be released on August 7th and you can get the title-track as a free taster. It's a neat, slightly squiggly experimental indie tune that recalls acts such as Dirty Projectors in the way that its difficult to pin down and not easily to classify. Tempo changes, rhythms borrowed from afrobeat, guitars that flit in and out of math-rock and the free-willed spirit of Animal Collective help to make the track interesting, unique and a real grower. Lock up your glassware and get stuck in.



Catch them live:

7/23 - Pianos - New York, NY
8/5 - AS220 - Providence, RI
8/7 - Elvis Guesthouse - New York, NY (Album Release show) 
8/15 - The Space - New Haven, CT
8/28 - Arlene's Grocery - New York, NY
8/29 - All Sounds - Bloomfield, NJ

Stolen Jars' website

The album will be available through Bandcamp





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Sunday 12 July 2015

This Month's Playlist + Get Me Free #1

Article by KevW

As with before, we'll be posting a new playlist every month featuring the best tunes from the past four weeks or so. Because we've had so many great submissions already, this month's playlist will feature a dozen of the best songs to land in our inbox recently. Some have been available for a few weeks, some are out later this month, but all deserve some attention, so you can listen to each track individually below, or streaming together on the player to the right. We'll be kicking off with the first of our new 'Get Me Free' series. Enjoy!


Get Me Free #1: 

Sam Page - So So Cynical


It's probably got to the point where Californian singer-songwriter Sam Page is sick of us comparing him to Bob Mould, so we won't do that. A year on from his album 'The Slog In Uncertainty', he's back with more driving alt-rock with an early '90s flavour in the shape of single 'So So Cynical', and it's as catchy and crisp as ever. You can download the song for free, or if you have some spare chance kicking about in your bank account then leave a tip.



Download 'So So Cynical' for free from this page

Sam Page's website





Lilies On Mars - Dancing Star


This first single from Lilies On Mars' forthcoming second album '∆GO' has got us very excited. 'Dancing Star' is a glistening ball of kraut-pop brilliance that recalls Stereolab, Cocteau Twins and The Horrors (with that band's Tom Furse helping out on production duties). More of this calibre and it could be a spectacular record.



Lilies On Mars' website

Buy the single





The Dreaming Spires - All Kinds Of People


It won't be any surprise to learn that The Dreaming Spires hail from the city their bears that nickname, Oxford. Having been involved in bands, festivals and other facets of the music world for many years, Robin and Joe Bennett are now the driving force behind some truly wonderful melodic guitar-pop. 'All Kinds Of People' is taken from their recent album 'Searching For The Supertruth'.



The Dreaming Spires' website

Buy the single





Garbanotas Bosistas - Trippy Love


Lithuanian band Garbanotas Bosistas have produced one of the best albums of the year so far in 'Above Us', a splendid collection of psychedelic dreampop tunes. They certainly deserve much more attention than they're likely to receive outside of their homeland, and 'Trippy Love' encompasses the vibe of long, hazy summer's days. It pretty much does what it says on the tin, and they've got plenty more where that came from.



Garbanotas Bosistas' website

Buy the track





The Helio Sequence - Battle Lines


In other blissful, sunny music news, Oregon duo The Helio Sequence released a new self-titled album back in May, and 'Battle Lines' is the woozy new single lifted from it. They've been releasing records since 1999 and established a good and deserved cult following, but with tracks like this they should probably be better known. So if this is your thing, then spread the word.



The Helio Sequence's website

Buy the single





The Creeping Ivies - The Witch House


Upon first hearing The Creeping Ivies very recently, it was instant new favourite band time. The Glaswegian trio have released several records already, and forthcoming new EP 'The Witch House' is another classic. If you like the Cramps and you like the 'Nuggets' '60s garage/psych series, then this is for you. Pre-order the three-track EP now and get an instant download of this track... which isn't even the best one of the trio...



The Creeping Ivies' website

Buy the single





Frog Eyes - Joe With The Jam


From British Columbia, Canadian band Frog Eyes will be releasing their new album 'Pickpocket's Locket' through Paper Bag Records on August 28th. Based on 'Joe With The Jam', it could be delightfully pieced together baroque indie that's not afraid to experiment, has occasional dark undercurrents and will be a hit with Bowie fans. Hard to argue with really.



Frog Eyes' website

Pre-order the album





Cfit - Dust Silhouettes


Dublin's Cfit seem to be getting better and better. After a very well received album, they're releasing a new single, 'Dust Silhouettes', on July 27th. It's a powerful and expansive alt-rock number with a punky edge and a certain urgency. If you pre-order the single from their Bandcamp page you get a free acoustic EP thrown in for good measure.



Cfit's website

Pre-order the single





The Smoking Trees - Home In The Morning


Back in 2012 we reviewed the first album by The Smoking Trees, an L.A duo consisting of Sir Psych and L.A.AL. Turns out we're back just in time for their second LP, 'TST', which is out this week on the ever reliable Ample Play imprint. 'Home In The Morning' is misty-eyed US psych with a hint of dreampop about it, and that's a very good thing.



The Smoking Trees' website

Buy the single





CENTREFOLDS - You, Me & Debauchery


After picking up some decent airplay and festival slots, CENTREFOLDS return this month with their new single 'You, Me & Debauchery' which is the classic sound of contemporary British indie music. Upbeat and full of handclaps, this track mixes funk and electro-pop with traditional guitar music resulting in something that seems destined for the airwaves.



CENTREFOLDS' website

Pre-order the single





Sonic Hearts Foundation - Godspeed


Glasgow's Sonic Hearts Foundation are back with a new EP, 'The Light Of The Future Sun', later this month, and the new single from it is 'Godspeed'. A brooding, stomping, gargantuan piece of atmospheric electro-rock, this sounds as though it was designed for making your speakers tremble with fear. Best served loud.



Sonic Hearts Foundation's website

Buy the single





PARQKS - Shade Is A Light That Faded


Based in the French city of Limoges, PARQKS are purveyors of very fine post-rock and shoegaze, carving out ambient and noisy soundscapes. Their EP, 'Slow Ascent Melancholia', was released last month and taken from it is the majestic, sky-scraping 'Shade Is A Light That Faded'; a carefully crafted journey through beautiful noise.



PARQKS' website

Buy the track





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